drxgonfly:

Northern Lights over Northern Lights Lake (by Bryan Hansel)

drxgonfly:

Northern Lights over Northern Lights Lake (by Bryan Hansel)

Tuesday Apr 22 10:34pm
LALALALA LOOKING FOR ANSWERS IN ALL THE WRONG PLACES

I.E. THE INTERNET

Tuesday Apr 22 10:33pm
dclementine:

http://joannaconcejo.blogspot.com

dclementine:

http://joannaconcejo.blogspot.com

Tuesday Apr 22 10:32pm

everyfiredies:

IT’S OK ABOUT ALL THE MESS UPS!

Tuesday Apr 22 05:01pm
etymology of the day: capital

capital (adj.) 

early 13c., “of or pertaining to the head,” from Old French capital, from Latin capitalis ”of the head,” hence “capital, chief, first,” from caput (genitive capitis) “head” (see capitulum). 

Meaning “principal” is early 15c. Of letters, “upper case,” from late 14c. A capital crime (1520s) is one that affects the life or “head;” capital had a sense of “deadly, mortal” from late 14c. in English, a sense also found in Latin. The felt connection between “head” and “life, mortality” also existed in Old English: as in heafodgilt ”deadly sin, capital offense,” heafdes þolian ”to forfeit life.” Capital punishment was in Blackstone (1765) and classical Latin capitis poena

Capital gain is recorded from 1921. Capital goods is recorded from 1899. Of ships, “first-rate, of the line,” attested from 1650s. Related: Capitally.

Tuesday Apr 22 03:11pm
Wednesday Apr 9 09:30am
spiritbreather:


William Eggleston Untitled Flowering Field 1978

eggleston

spiritbreather:

William Eggleston Untitled Flowering Field 1978

eggleston

Wednesday Apr 2 01:04am

All the Big Trees

Wednesday Mar 26 10:35pm
All seen things are temporary. All unseen things are eternal. Take time to find the unseen. A Wrinkle in Time (via journaling-junkie) Wednesday Mar 26 10:06pm
Etymology of the day: season

season (n.)

c.1300, “a period of the year,” with reference to weather or work, also “proper time, suitable occasion,” from Old French seisonsaison ”season, date; right moment, appropriate time” (Modern French saison) “a sowing, planting,” from Latin sationem (nominative satio) “a sowing, planting,” noun of action from past participle stem of serere ”to sow” (see sow (v.)). 

Sense shifted in Vulgar Latin from “act of sowing” to “time of sowing,” especially “spring, regarded as the chief sowing season.” In Old Provençal and Old French (and thus in English), this was extended to “season” in general. In other Indo-European languages, generic “season” (of the year) words typically are from words for “time,” sometimes with a word for “year” (e.g. Latin tempus (anni), German Jahrzeit). 

Wednesday Mar 26 09:52pm
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